Istanbul Hints

Author: Kereta

Customized tour Bulgaria

After a hardworking month or year, the normal thing is to think of a way to relax. Many and different the ways are but the most common one is to travel. Although the easiest way to do it is by reading a nice book, a magazine or a brochure about a place, you can simply see a commercial on TV. Then travel in your mind to different worlds. That’s how dreams are born. Dreams to visit these worlds in real. The imagination is woken up and takes over. Once it’s up, you cannot stop it easily. It hovers around. It needs information to grow, to realize and to make the dreams for customized tour Bulgaria come true.

Then, there is another way, the actual travelling. However, it is not in your mind but in a car, on the bus or plane, or in your mobile home – camper. This i the travelling that follows the imagination. Then dreams become reality and memories start to fill your mind, your heart. The next best thing to be done is to plan your Bulgaria holidays. And put your customized tour Bulgaria in action.

Visit Bulgaria

Tour bulgaria, Belogradchik Fortress InnerThe laugh, the games, even the songs during a nice journey cannot be replaced for a better thing.

Firstly, Bulgaria is a good place to start with (if you haven’t yet started) or the next good place to visit.

Secondly, there are many things to do and places to visit in Bulgaria. For example, the Bulgarian Black Sea coast is a destination, preferred by many (coastal Bulgaria holidays). And as the climate is good, it can turn out a really relaxing and fun holiday in Bulgaria.

Balkan (mountain) tours are for the ones who need a more peaceful vacation.

Last  but not least are the Rose Valley, the valley of the Thracian Kings, the old good Plovdiv. Or Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria. The monasteries – The Rozhen Monastery or the Rila Monastery, the Aladzha Monastery, all the festivals…

Please visit www.enmarbg.com for detailed information.

10/03/2019     0 Comments  

Private Bulgaria tours Yachting

Private Bulgaria tours yachting in a different yachting way

Close your eyes and think about your dream private Bulgaria tours. Also, think about private Bulgaria tours yachting. And get ready to explore the country and the Black Sea coast in a completely different way.

Yachting in Bulgaria offers opportunities for turning your holiday into beautiful memories. And I promise you can collect memories everywhere in Bulgaria. (Sofia sightseeing)

During the past few years, some of the elite marine complexes and resort towns have built yacht ports. The ports in the resorts Rusalka, Tyulenovo, Balchik, Golden Sands and Varna offer fine opportunities for private Bulgaria tours yachting along the northern Black Sea coast. Options for yacht tourism on the southern Black Sea coast are offered in Burgas. And at the resorts St. Vlas, Nesebar, Sozopol, and Dyuni as well.

Why Bulgaria

Why you should choose Bulgaria? What are the things to do in Bulgaria when sailing on the Black Sea? When on private Bulgaria tours yachting?

Bulgarian nature. Because the country is a piece of heaven – warm sea, sunny beaches and the magnificent peaks of the mountains, in the near distance, covered in snow. It is beautiful mountains and valleys (visit the Rose Valley for Rose Festival tour). It is forests, lakes, waterfalls, rivers and sea as well. You can find anything you want. Climate in Bulgaria is moderate – warm, sunny summers and mild but snowy winters. The sea – quiet, calm, warm sea. Amazing long beaches with incredible sand, picturesque rocky shores. These are ones of the main Bulgaria tourist attractions for Bulgaria private tours.

Bulgaria Boat Trip

Bulgaria is an ancient country with rich history and a lot to show to tourists who decide to visit Bulgaria and enjoy private Bulgaria tours (and private Bulgaria tours yachting). There are numerous historical and architectural sites to be seen. Among them are the Varna Necropolis, where the oldest processed gold in the world is found; Thracian tombs and temples with gold treasures of world appreciation; architectural and historical sites and parks and many others…

08/03/2019     0 Comments  

A Wagner Matinee part 6

During the intermission before the second half, I questioned my aunt and found that the “Prize Song” was not new to her. Some years before there had drifted to the farm in Red Willow County a young German, a tramp cow-puncher, who had sung in the chorus at Bayreuth when he was a boy, along with the other peasant boys and girls. On a Sunday morning he used to sit on his gingham-sheeted bed in the hands’ bedroom which opened off the kitchen, cleaning the leather of his boots and saddle, singing the “Prize Song,” while my aunt went about her work in the kitchen.

Boyish face

She had hovered over him until she had prevailed upon him to join the country church, though his sole fitness for this step, in so far as I could gather, lay in his boyish face, and his possession of this divine melody. Shortly afterward, he had gone to town on the Fourth of July, been drunk for several days, lost his money at a faro table, ridden a saddled Texas steer on a bet, and disappeared with a fractured collar-bone. All this my aunt told me huskily, wonderingly, as though she were talking in the weak lapses of illness.

“Well, we have come to better things than the old Trovatore at any rate, Aunt Georgie?” I queried, with a well-meant effort at jocularity.

Her lip quivered and she hastily put her handkerchief up to her mouth. From behind it she murmured, “And you have been hearing this ever since you left me, Clark?” Her question was the gentlest and saddest of reproaches.

The second half of the program consisted of four numbers from the Ring, and closed with Siegfried’s funeral march. My aunt wept quietly but almost continuously, as a shallow vessel overflows in a rain-storm. From time to time her dim eyes looked up at the lights, burning softly under their dull glass globes.

The deluge of sound poured on and on; I never knew what she found in the shining current of it; I never knew how far it bore her, or past what happy islands. From the trembling of her face, I could well believe that before the last number she had been carried out where the myriad graves are, into the gray, nameless burying grounds of the sea, or into some world of death vaster yet, where, from the beginning of the world, hope has lain down with hope and dream with dream and, renouncing, slept.

The concert was over; the people filed out of the hall chattering and laughing, glad to relax and find the living level again, but my kinswoman made no effort to rise. The harpist slipped the green felt cover over his instrument; the flute-players shook the water from their mouthpieces; the men of the orchestra went out one by one, leaving the stage to the chairs and music stands, empty as a winter cornfield.

I spoke to my aunt. She burst into tears and sobbed pleadingly. “I don’t want to go, Clark, I don’t want to go!”

I understood. For her, just outside the concert hall, lay the black pond with the cattle-tracked bluffs; the tall, unpainted house, with weather-curled boards, naked as a tower; the crook-backed ash seedlings where the dish-cloths hung to dry; the gaunt, moulting turkeys picking up refuse about the kitchen door.

07/03/2019     0 Comments  

A Wagner Matinee part 5

The overture closed, my aunt released my coat sleeve, but she said nothing. She sat staring dully at the orchestra. What, I wondered, did she get from it? She had been a good pianist in her day, I knew, and her musical education had been broader than that of most music teachers of a quarter of a century ago. She had often told me of Mozart’s operas and Meyerbeer’s, and I could remember hearing her sing, years ago, certain melodies of Verdi.

When I had fallen ill, with a fever in her house she used to sit by my cot in the evening when the cool night wind blew in through the faded mosquito netting tacked over the window and I lay watching a certain bright star that burned redmbove the cornfield and sing “Home to our mountains, O let us return!” in a way fit-to break the heart of a Vermont boy near dead of home-sickness already.

Seething turmoil

I watched her closely through the prelude to Tristan and Isolde, trying vainly to conjecture what that seething turmoil of strings and winds might mean to her, but she sat mutely staring at the violin bows that drove obliquely downward, like the pelting streaks of rain in a summer shower. Had this music any message for her?

Had she enough left, to at all comprehend this power which had kindled the world since she had left it. I was in a fever of curiosity, but Aunt Georgiana sat silent upon her peak in Darien. She preserved this utter immobility throughout the number from The Flying Dutchman, though her fingers worked mechanically upon her black dress, as if, of themselves, they were recalling the piano score they had once played. Poor hands! They had been stretched and twisted into mere tentacles to hold and lift and knead with; on one of them a thin worn band that had once been a wedding ring. As I pressed and gently quieted one of these groping hands, I remembered with quivering eyelids their services for me in other days.

Soon after the tenor began the “Prize Song,” I heard a quick drawn breath, and turned to my aunt. Her eyes were closed, but the tears were glistening on her cheeks, and I think, in a moment more, they were in my eyes as well.

It never really dies, then the soul which can suffer so excruciatingly and so interminably; it withers to the outward eye only; like that strange moss which can lie on a dusty shelf half a century, and yet, if placed in water, grow green again. She wept so throughout the development and elaboration of the melody.

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A Wagner Matinee part 4

The matinee audience was made up chiefly of women. One lost the contour of faces and figures, indeed any effect of line whatever, and there was only the color of bodices past counting, the shimmer of fabrics soft and fine, silky and sheer; red, mauve, pink, blue, lilac, purple, ticru, rose, yellow, cream, and white, all the colors that an impressionist finds in a sunlit landscape, with here and there the dead shadow of a frock coat. My Aunt Georgiana regarded them as though they had been so many daubs of tube-paint on a palette.

Old Maggie

When the musicians came out and took their places, she gave a little stir of anticipation, and looked with quickening interest down over the rail at that invariable grouping, perhaps the first wholly familiar thing that had greeted her eye since she had left old Maggie and her weakling calf. I could feel how all those details sank into her soul, for I had not forgotten how they had sunk into mine when I came fresh from plowing forever and forever between green aisles of corn, where, as in a treadmill, one might walk from daybreak to dusk without perceiving a shadow of change.

The clean profiles of the musicians, the gloss of their linen, the dull black of their coats, the beloved shapes of the instruments, the patches of yellow light on the smooth, varnished bellies of the ’cellos and the bass viols in the rear, the restless, wind- tossed forest of fiddle necks and bows I recalled how, in the first orchestra I ever heard, those long bow-strokes seemed to draw the heart out of me, as a conjurer’s stick reels out yards of paper ribbon from a hat.

The first number was the Tannhauser overture. When the horns drew out the first strain of the “Pilgrims’ Chorus,” Aunt Georgiana clutched my coat sleeve.

Then it was I first realized that for her this broke u silence of thirty years. With the battle between the two motives, with the frenzy of the Venusberg theme and its rippings of strings, there came to me an overwhelming sense of the waste and wear we are so power-less to combat; and I saw again the tall, naked house on the prairie, black and grim as a wooden fortress; the black pond where I had learned to swim, its margin pitted with sun-dried cattle tracks; the rain gullied clay banks about the naked house, the four dwarf ash seedlings where the dish-cloths were always hung to dry before the kitchen door.

The world there was the flat world of the ancients; to the east, a cornfield that stretched to daybreak; to the west, a corral that reached to sunset; between, the conquests of peace, dearer-bought than those of war.

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A Wagner Matinee part 3

When my aunt appeared on the morning after her arrival in Boston, she was still in a semi-somnambulant state. She seemed not to realize that she was in the city where she had spent her youth, the place longed for hungrily half a lifetime. She had been so wretchedly train-sick throughout the journey that she had no recollection of anything but her discomfort, and, to all intents and purposes, there were but a few hours of nightmare between the farm in Red Willow County and my study on Newbury Street.

I had planned a little pleasure for her that afternoon, to repay her for some of the glorious moments she had given me when we used to milk together in the straw-thatched cowshed and she, because I was more than usually tired, or because her husband had spoken sharply to me, would tell me of the splendid performance of the Huguenots she had seen in Paris, in her youth.

Symphony Orchestra

At two o’clock the Symphony Orchestra was to give a Wagner program, and I intended to take my aunt; though, as I conversed with her,
I grew doubtful about her enjoyment of it. I suggested our visiting the Conservatory and the Common before lunch, “but she seemed altogether too timid to wish to venture out.

She questioned me absently about various changes in the city, but she was chiefly concerned that she had forgotten to leave instructions about feeding half-skimmed milk to a certain weakling calf, “old Maggie’s calf, you know, Clark,” she explained, evidently having forgotten how long I had been away. She was further troubled because she had neglected to tell her daughter about the freshly opened kit of mackerel in the cellar, which would spoil if it were not used directly.

I asked her whether she had ever heard any of the Wagnerian operas, and found that she had not, though she was perfectly familiar with their respective situations, and had once possessed the piano score of The Flying Dutchman. I began to think it would be best to get her back to Red Willow County without waking her, and regretted having suggested the concert.

From the time we entered the concert hall, however, she was a trifle less passive and inert, and for the first time seemed to perceive her surroundings. I had felt some trepidation lest she might become aware of her queer country clothes, or might experience some painful embarrassment at stepping suddenly into the world to which she had been dead for a quarter of a century.

But, again, I found how superficially I had judged her. She sat looking about her with eyes as impersonal, almost as stony, as those with which the granite Rameses in a museum watches the froth and fret that ebbs and flows about his pedestal. I have seen this same aloofness in old miners who drift into the Brown hotel at Denver, their pockets full of bullion, their linen soiled, their haggard faces unshaven; standing in the thronged corridors as solitary as though they were still in a frozen camp on the Yukon.

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A Wagner Matinee part 2

Whatever shock Mrs. Springer experienced at my aunt’s appearance, she considerately concealed. As for myself, I saw my aunt’s battered figure with that feeling of awe and respect with which we behold explorers who have left their ears and fingers north of Franz- Joseph Land or their health somewhere along the Upper Congo.

My Aunt Georgiana had been a music teacher at the Boston Conservatory, somewhere back in the later sixties. One summer, while visiting in the little village among the Green Mountains where her ancestors had dwelt for generations, she had kindled the callow fancy of my uncle, Howard Carpenter, then an idle, shiftless boy of twenty-one. When she returned to her duties in Boston, Howard followed her, and the upshot of this infatuation was that she eloped with him, eluding the reproaches of her family and the criticism of her friends by going with him to the Nebraska frontier.

Carpenter

Carpenter, who, of course, had no money, took up a homestead in Red Willow County, fifty miles from the railroad. There they had measured off their land themselves, driving across the prairie in a wagon, to the wheel of which they had tied a red cotton hand-kerchief, and counting its revolutions. They built a dugout in the red hillside, one of those cave dwellings whose inmates so often reverted to primitive conditions. Their water they got from the lagoons where the buffalo drank, and their slender stock of provisions was always at the mercy of roving Indians. For thirty years my aunt had not been farther than fifty miles from the homestead.

I owed to this woman most of the good that ever came my way in my boyhood, and had a reverential affection for her. During the yeant when I was riding here for my uncle, my aunt, after cooking the three : meals the first of which was ready at six o’clock in the morning and putting the six children to bed, would often stand until midnight at her ironing-board, with me at the kitchen table beside her, hearing me recite Latin declensions and conjugations, gently shaking me when my drowsy head sank down over a page of irregular verbs.

It was to her, at her ironing or mending, that I read my first Shakespeare, and her old textbook on mythology was the first that ever came into my empty hands. She taught me my scales and exercises on the little parlor organ which her husband had bought her after fifteen years during which she had not so much as seen a musical instrument. She would sit beside me by the hour, darning and counting, while I struggled with the “Joyous Farmer.” She seldom talked to me about music, and I understood why. Once when I had been doggedly beating out some easy passages from an old score of Euryanthe I had found among her music books, she came up to me and, putting her hands over my eyes, gently drew my head back upon her shoulder, saying tremulously, “Don’t love it so well, Clark, or it may be taken from you.”

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A Wagner Matinee part 1

Willa Gather (1876-1947)

Willa Sibert Cather was born at Winchester, Va., in 1876. She was for some years engaged in newspaper work, and was until 1912 associate editor of McClure’s Magazine. Her novels, My Antonia and A Lost Lady, are among the best modern American fiction. In Jier volume Touth and the Bright Medusa she offers a variety of well-written short stories. Miss Cather described with honesty and power the characters and scenes she knew and understood.

A Wagner Matinee is reprinted from Youth and the Bright Medusa. Copyright, 1920, by Alfred A. Knopf, New York, and William Heinemann, London, by whose permission it is here used.

A Wagner Matinee

I received one morning a letter, written in pale ink on glossy blue-lined note-paper, and bearing the postmark of a little Nebraska village. This communication, worn and rubbed, looking as if it had been carried for some days in a coat pocket that was none too clean, was from my Uncle Howard, and informed me that his wife had been left a small legacy by a bachelor relative, and that it would be necessary for her to go to Boston to attend the settling of the estate. He requested me to meet her at the station and render her whatever services might be necessary. On examining the date indicated as that of her arrival, I found it to be no later than to-morrow. He had characteristically delayed writing until, had I been away from home for a day, I must have missed my aunt altogether.

The name of my Aunt Georgiana opened before me a gulf of recollection so wide and deep that, as the letter dropped from my hand, I felt suddenly a stranger to all the present conditions of my existence, wholly ill at ease and out of place amid the familiar surroundings of my study. I became, in short, the gangling farm-boy my aunt had known, scourged with chilblains and bashfulness, my hands cracked and sore from the corn husking. I sat again before her parlor organ fumbling the scales with my stiff red fingers, while she, beside me, made canvas mittens for the huskers.

The next morning, after preparing my landlady for a visitor, I set out for the station. When the train arrived. I had some difficulty in finding my aunt. She was the last of the passengers to alight, and it was not until I got her into the carriage that she seeemed really to recognize me. She had come all the way in a day coach; her linen duster had become black with soot and her black bonnet gray with dust during the journey. When we arrived at my boarding house the landlady put her to bed at once and I did not see her again until the next morning.

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Journalism in Tennessee part 5

I said, “I’ll have to get you to excuse me; I think maybe I might write to suit you after a while; as soon as I had had some practice and learned the language I am confident I could. But, to speak the plain truth, that sort of energy of expression has its inconveniences, and a man is liable to interruption. You see that yourself.

Vigorous writing is calculated to elevate the public, no doubt, but then I do not like to attract so much attention as it calls forth. I can’t write with comfort when I am interrupted so much as I have been to-day. I like this berth well enough, but I don’t like to be left here to wait on the customers.

The experiences are novel, I grant you, and entertaining too, after a fashion, but they are not judiciously distributed. A gentleman shoots at you through the window and cripples me; a bomb-shell comes down the stove-pipe for your gratification and sends the stove- door down my throat; a friend drops in to swap compliments with you, and freckles me with bullet-holes till my skin won’t hold my principles; you go to dinner, and Jones comes with his cowhide, Gillespie throws me out of the window, Thompson tears all my clothes off, and an entire stranger takes my scalp with the easy freedom of an old acquaintance; and in less than five minutes all the blackguards in the country arrive in their war-paint, and proceed to scare the rest of me to death with their tomahawks. Take it altogether, I never had such a spirited time in all my life as I have had to-day.

Tennesseean journalism

No; I like you, and I like your calm unruffled way of explaining things to the customers, but you see I am not used to it. The Southern heart is too impulsive; Southern hospitality is too lavish with the stranger. The paragraphs which I have written to-day, and into whose cold sentences your masterly hand has infused the fervent spirit of Tennesseean journalism, will wake up another nest of hornets. All that mob of editors will come—and they will come hungry, too, and want somebody for breakfast. I shall have to bid you adieu. I decline to be present at these festivities. I came South for my health, I will go back on the same errand, and suddenly. Tennesseean journalism is too stirring for me.”

After which we parted with mutual regret, and I took apartments at the hospital.

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Journalism in Tennessee part 4

They then talked about the elections and the crops while they reloaded, and I fell to tying up my wounds. But presently they opened fire again with animation, and every shot took effect but it is proper to remark that five out of the six fell to my share. The sixth one mortally wounded the Colonel, who remarked, with fine humor, that he would have to say good morning now, as he had business up town. He then inquired the way to the undertaker’s and left.

The chief turned to me and said, “I am expecting company to dinner, and shall have to get ready. It will be a favor to me if you will read proofs and attend to the customers.”

I winced a little at the idea of attending to the customers, but I was too bewildered by the fusillade that was still ringing in my ears to think of anything to say.

Blistering article

He continued, “Jones will be here at three cowhide him. Gillespie will call earlier, perhaps throw him out of the window. Ferguson will be along about four kill him. That is all for today, I believe. If you have any odd time, you may write a blistering article on the police give the Chief Inspector rats. The cowhides are under the table; weapons in the drawer ammunition there in the corner lint and bandages up there in the pigeon-holes. In case of accident, go to Lancet, the surgeon, downstairs. He advertises we take it out in fulness were gone from me. Gillespie had called and thrown me out of the window.

Jones arrived promptly, and when I got ready to do the cowhiding he took the job off my hands. In an encounter with a stranger, not in the bill of fare, I had lost my scalp. Another stranger, by the name of Thompson, left me a mere wreck and ruin of chaotic rags. And at last, at bay in the corner, and beset by an infuriated mob of editors, blacklegs, politicians, and desperadoes, who raved and swore and flourished their weapons about my head till the air shimmered with glancing flashes of steel, I was in the act of resigning my berth on the paper, when the chief arrived, and with him a rabble of charming and enthusiastic friends.

Then ensued a scene of riot and carnage such as no human pen, or steel one either, could describe. People were shot, probed, dismembered, blown up, thrown out of the window. There was a brief tornado of murky blasphemy, with a confused and frantic war-dance glimmering through it, and then all was over. In five minutes there was silence, and the gory chief and I sat alone and surveyed the sanguinary ruin that strewed the floor around us.

He said, “You’ll like this place when you get used to it.”

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Journalism in Tennessee part 3

That ass, Blossom, of the Higginsville Thunderbolt and Battle Cry of Freedom, is down here again sponging at the Van Buren.

We observe that the besotted blackguard of the Mud Spring Morning Howl is giving out, with his usual propensity for lying, that Van Werter is not elected. The heaven-born mission of journalism is to disseminate truth; to eradicate error; to educate, refine and elevate the tone of public morals and manners, and make all men more gentle, more virtuous, more charitable, and in all ways better, and holier, and happier; and yet this black-hearted scoundrel degrades his great office persistently to the dissemination of falsehood, calumny, vituperation, and vulgarity.

Idea of a pavement

Blathersville wants a Nicholson pavement—it wants a jail and a poor- house more. The idea of a pavement in a one-horse town composed of two gin-mills, a blacksmith’s shop, and that mustard-plaster of a news-paper, the Daily Hurrah! The crawling insect, Buckner, who edits the Hurrah, is braying about this business with his customary imbecility, and imagining that he is talking sense.

“Now that is the way to write—peppery and to the point. Mush-and- milk journalism gives me the fan-tods.”

About this time a brick came through the window with a splintering crash, and gave me a considerable of a jolt in the back. I moved out of range—I began to feel in the way.

The chief said, “That was the Colonel, likely. I’ve been expecting him for two days. He will be up, now, right away.”

He was correct. The Colonel appeared in the door a moment afterward with a dragoon revolver in his hand. 

He said, “Sir, have I the honor of addressing the poltroon who edits this mangy sheet?”

“You have. Be seated, sir. Be careful of the chair, one of its legs is gone. I believe I have the honor of addressing the putrid liar, Col. Blatherskite Tecumseh?”

“Right, sir. I have a little account to settle with you. If you are at leisure we will begin.”

“I have an article on the ‘Encouraging Progress of Moral and Intellectual Development in America,’ to finish, but there is no hurry. Begin.”
Both pistols rang out their fierce clamor at the same instant. The chief lost a lock of his hair, and the Colonel’s bullet ended its career in the fleshy part of my thigh.

The Colonel’s left shoulder was clipped a little. They fired again. Both missed their men this time, but I got my share, a shot in the arm. At the third fire both gentlemen were wounded slightly, and I had a knuckle chipped. I then said I believed I would go out and take a walk, as this was a private matter, and I had a delicacy about participating in it further. But both gentlemen begged me to keep my seat, ana assured me that I was not in the way.

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Journalism in Tennessee part 2

John W. Blossom, Esq., the able editor of the Higginsville Thunderbolt and Battle Cry of Freedom, arrived in the city yesterday. He is stopping at the Van Buren House.

We observe that our contemporary of the Mud Springs Morning Howl, has fallen into’ the error of supposing that the election of Van Werter is not an established fact, but he will have discovered his mistake before this reminder reaches him, no doubt. He was doubtless misled by incomplete election returns.

It is pleasant to note that the city of Blathersville is endeavoring to contract with some New York gentleman to pave its well-nigh impassable streets with the Nicholson pavement. The Daily Hurrah urges the measure with ability, and seems confident of ultimate success.

Presently

I passed my manuscript over to the chief editor for acceptance, alteration, or destruction. He glanced at it and his face clouded. He ran his eye down the pages, and his countenance grew portentous. It was easy to see that something was wrong. Presently he sprang up and said “Thunder and lightning! Do you suppose I am going to speak of those cattle that way? Do you suppose my subscribers are going to stand such gruel as that? Give me the pen!”

I never saw a pen scrape and scratch its way so viciously, or plow through another man’s verbs and adjectives so relentlessly. While he was in the midst of his work, somebody shot at him through the open window, and marred the symmetry of my ear.

“Ah,” said he, “that is that scoundrel Smith, of the Moral Volcano— he was due yesterday.” And he snatched a navy revolver from his belt and fired. Smith dropped, shot in the thigh. The shot spoiled Smith’s aim, who was just taking a second chance, and he crippled a stranger. It was me. Merely a finger shot off.

Then the chief editor went on with his erasures and interlineations. Just as he finished them a hand-grenade came down the stove-pipe, and the explosion shivered the stove into a thousand fragments. However, it did no further damage, except that a vagrant piece knocked ,i couple of my teeth out.

“That stove is utterly ruined,” said the chief editor.

I said I believed it was.

“Well, no matter don’t want it this kind of weather. I know the man that did it. I’ll get him. Now, here is the way this stuff ought to he written.”
The inveterate liars of the Semi-Weekly Earthquake are evidently endeavoring to palm off upon a noble and chivalrous people another of their vile and brutal falsehoods with regard to that most glorious conception of the Nineteenth Century, the Ballyhack railroad. The idea that Buz- zardville was to be left off at one side originated in their own fulsome brains—or rather in the settlings which they regard as brains. They had better swallow this lie if they want to save their abandoned reptile carcasses the cowhiding they so richly deserve.

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Journalism in Tennessee part 1

Mark Twain (Samuel L. Clemens) (1835-1910)

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, universally known under his pen-name of Mark Twain, was born at Florida, Mo., in 1835. His early education was fragmentary. He spent some years of his youth as a journeyman printer, wandering from town to town. At the age of seventeen he worked on a Mississippi boat, and later went West with his brother. In Nevada he began to write for the newspapers.

In i86g he achieved his first great success with Innocents Abroad, based on his experiences in Europe. Then followed a long period of travelling, lecturing, business enterprise, and writing. He is one of the best-known American authors throughout the world. Though Mark Twain’s brief sketches can for the most part hardly be considered short stories, there are a few, like that which follows, that may legitimately be included in the category. It is reprinted from Sketches, Mew and Old, 1875.

Journalism in Tennessee

From Sketches, New and Old

I was told by the physician that a Southern climate would improve my health, and so I went down to Tennessee, and got a berth on the Morning Glory and Johnson County War-Whoop as associate editor. When I went on duty I found the chief editor sitting tilted back in a three-legged chair with his feet on a pine table.

There was another pine table in the room and another afflicted chair, and both were half buried under newspapers and scraps and sheets of manuscript. There was a wooden box of sand, sprinkled with cigar stubs and “old soldiers,” and a stove with a door hanging by its upper hinge. The chief editor had a long-tailed black frock coat on, and white linen pants. His boots were small and neatly blacked.

He wore a ruffled shirt, a large seal ring, a standing collar of obsolete pattern, and a checkered neckerchief with the ends hanging down. Date of costume about 1848. He was smoking a cigar, and trying to think of a word, and in pawing his hair he had rumpled his locks a good deal. He was scowling fearfully, and I judged that he was concocting a particularly knotty editorial. He told me to take the exchanges and skim through them and write up the “Spirit of the Tennessee Press,” condensing into the article all of their contents that seemed of interest.

The editors of the Semi-Weekly Earthquake evidently labor under a misapprehension with regard to the Bally hack railroad. It is not the object of the company to leave Buzzardville off to one side. On the contrary, they consider it one of the most important points along the line, and consequently can have no desire to slight it. The gentlemen of the Earthquake will, of course, take pleasure in making the correction.

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Discover Varna

Private Tours Bulgaria – Varna – an attractive place…

Bulgaria maybe a small country but it has two capitals. And they are Sofia (Sofia city tour) and the sea capital, Varna. Varna is one of the oldest settlements on the Bulgarian lands. It is on the Bulgarian coast and is the third biggest city in Bulgaria. It’s been officially announced a sea resort in 1921. It is also one of Bulgaria destinations that tourists like. It is a lively place which everybody remembers long after. A great place for great private tours in Bulgaria.

Varna

‘The Museum of History and Arts’ will introduce us to the history and culture of Varna from its early centuries to the Second Bulgarian Kingdom.

Private Tours Bulgaria Varna – Park-Museum of the Combat Friendship

‘Park-Museum of the Combat Friendship’ is a pleasant place for relaxation both for families with children and individual tourists. It offers history monuments as well as nature beauties.

One of the symbols of the sea capital is the Cathedral of the Assumption of the Virgin. It is a temple for the ones praying and an attraction for the tourists. This holy place will take us in the world of spirituality.

Our private tours in Bulgaria, around Varna, follow the development of the city during its different stages. The ‘Museum of National Revival’ – the exposition highlights the important moments of Varna’s history during the Revival period.

Varna is considered an important cultural centre. It hosts the Film Festival ‘Love is Folly’. Also, the Varna Summer International Music Festival. The International Puppet Festival ‘Golden Dolphin’ too and many others.

Varna is not the only place in Bulgaria that hosts festivals, though. Quite many places have their holdays, carnivals. The town of Kazanlak is one of these places. It is famous for its Rose Festival (Bulgaria private tours kazanlak).

The article above is copied from the official website of EnmarBg. For more information, please visit www.enmarbg.com.

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Bulgaria Tour Balchik Kaliakra Yailata

Balchik Kaliakra Yailata – to remember your Bulgaria tour

Our offer is for one day Bulgaria tour Balchik. Kaliakra, Yailata and Balchik are not far away from Varna. And they are on the Bulgarian coast as well. As for the capital of Bulgaria, the distance is a little bit too much for one day from Sofia. However, there is a solution. A day in Sofia for sightseeing tour Sofia. Then, from one capital to the other, Varna.

. Kaliakra, Yailata and Balchik are not far away from Varna. And they are on the Bulgarian coast as well. As for the capital of Bulgaria, the distance is a little bit too much for one day from Sofia. However, there is a solution. A day in Sofia for sightseeing tour Sofia. Then, from one capital to the other, Varna.

Stone Forest

So, let the tour begin. We are leaving from Varna in the morning to the town of Balchik (Bulgaria tour Balchik). The town is the third in significance Bulgarian port after Varna and Burgas. One of the main tourist attractions in Balchik is the Architectural Park Complex ‘Balchik Palace’. It was built between 1926 and 1937 as a summer residence for the Romanian Queen Maria.

06/03/2019     0 Comments  

Diego Endara Tour

VIIIth International Meeting Bulgaria 2018

Diego Endara, an eccentric guy from Ecuador. He is passionately in love with Bulgaria and has already written 3 books about it. He managed to gather a group of ex students in Bulgaria and their families from around 11 countries, mostly from middle and South America. And here they are, in Bulgaria, for their excellent Bulgaria tour. Of course, I shouldn’t forget to mention that Diego suggested an itinerary. We forked on different routes for almost a year. Eventually, a little bit tight but good program came as a result.

Some of these students (successful people and professionals today) studied in Bulgaria 30 years ago. Very few of them have come back to Bulgaria once or twice for these 30 years. But 2018 was the year they all met here, in Bulgaria. It was a great and memorable experience for them…
We are looking forward to entertain you again, Diego.

The tour

Sofia

Meet the guide at Sofia Airport beginning of September, 2018.
Check in into a hotel in Sofia. Dinner in the hotel and overnight. Everybody is tired from their flights.

Sofia – Vitosha Mountain

That was the day devoted to Sofia. A sightseeing tour Sofia – to see if Sofia has changed for the last 30 years.

Sofia is the capital of Bulgaria and it’s not a big metropolis (just like whole Bulgaria – small and full of beauty and surprises). But it’s a modern, youthful city where churches, synagogues, Ottoman mosques and communist monuments live together peacefully and in harmony. Sofia is an old settlement with the previous name of Serdica. The tour offers a good mixture of traditional and modern Sofia. Well, has Sofia changed? Has Bulgaria changed for the last 30 years?

Some time spent on Vitosha Mountain. When one lives in a big city, where life never seems to stop and the city is at the foot of a mountain, is considered lucky. Vitosha Mountain means relaxation and it’s a great opportunity to slow the pace down a little bit.

You like to learn more then please visit www.enmarbg.com.

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Beglik Tash Tour

Tours Bulgaria Beglik Tash – one-day tour

Tours Bulgaria Beglik Tash include Nessebar, Beglik Tash and the river Ropotamo

Because the tour starts from Nessebar, here we give you short information about the distance from the bigger Bulgarian cities and the capital Sofia (city tours Sofia):
Sofia – Nessebar – 412 km/ 4 hours
Varna – Nessebar – 100 km/ 1 hour 30 min
Burgas – Nessebar – 35 km/ 35 min
Plovdiv – Nessebar – 282 km/ 2 hours 50 min

The tour starts from Nessebar – the ‘Pearl of the Black Sea’. This town on the Black sea coast is a modern and contemporary town. It is perfect for great Bulgaria tours.

Nessebar can be a starting point for other coastal Bulgaria tours.

Of course, Nessebar is in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites. The Old Nessebar is the place that attracts people the most. This is because it is an attractive place for romantic walks along the narrow cobbled streets. The well-preserved houses of the Revival Period, typical for the Black Sea architecture, add to the charm of the Old Nessebar. The Archaelogical Museum, the Church of St Sophia or the Old Bishopric (the Old Mitropoliya) are only part of the interesting places to visit. Also the Church of St Stephen or the New Bishopric (the New Mitropoliya).

Nessebar is especially proud of its churches. Main Bulgaria tourist attractions the churches are impressive, no matter if you are a worshipper or not.

Please visit www.enmarbg.com for more detailed information.

02/03/2019     0 Comments  

Tours Bulgaria around Monasteries

Monasteries in Bulgaria, tours Bulgaria, are unique because of their rich architecture, their icons and wall paintings. It’s not about religion or belief. Nor about being part of a mystery. It’s about a special atmosphere. Atmosphere of intimacy, cosiness… Bulgarian monasteries are also unique because of the legends around them. There is always mystery around each holy place.

This 22-day monasteries tour we made for a family for the summer of 2017. Many monasteries, many places they visited. All good memories and experiences.

Here we introduce the tour to you, the different destinations with some information.

The tour

Sofia – Rila Monastery

On the day of the arrival, for all tours Bulgaria, you meet the guide. This tour started with a visit to the Rila Monastery. This is the place that preserved Bulgarian culture alive in the years of the Ottomans (Istanbul day trips). Declared a National Museum and a National Historical reserve, The Rila Monastery is included in the List of World Cultural Heritage of UNESCO. It also became a National Museum and a National Historical reserve. The monastery is one of the symbols of Bulgaria.

Rila Monastery – Melnik

A tour around the monastery to get you to know this holy place and feel its atmosphere.

Not far away is the smallest town of Bulgaria, Melnik. The tour, tours Bulgaria, takes you to a place definitely not ‘small’ in history. The thousands-year-old Melnik offers serenity, a mountain, rich history, cosiness, stunning scenery, rich wine… It is a romantic and full of charm place.

Melnik is the smallest town of Bulgaria. People also know it as one of the places where great wine is produced and the place of the sand pyramids. The Kordopulov’s House is supposed to be the biggest residential building on the Balkan Peninsula from the Revival period. And it is in that small town of Melnik.

Rozhen Monastery, Baba Vanga, Rupite

When you tell a Bulgarian Melnik, they will immediately tell you about the already mentioned things and also the Rozhen Monastery and Rupite.
Rupite is one of the best places to visit in Bulgaria, on tours Bulgaria. It is best known as the place where the Bulgarian medium Baba Vanga lived and was buried. The area is in fact the crater of an extinct volcano. There is the ‘St. Petka’ Church, built with Vanga’s will and a place of worship for many people. There is also her small house where she would meet all the people in need in the last 25 years of her life.

‘St. Antonius the Great’ Monastery and another monastery are awaiting us – this is the Rozhen Monastery, built in 1890, with fine frescoes and amazing wood carvings.

Like I promised, there are always legends and secrets around the monasteries and churches in Bulgaria. There is a mystery, they say, of Dobarsko Church. It is very distinct from average Orthodox churches. Its freѕсoeѕ dated 400 уears ago. Among them there are two dіѕmaуіng freѕсоeѕ of Јeѕuѕ Chrіѕt deрісted іn ѕomethіng that lookѕ lіke a ѕрaсeѕhір. It is a small church – 160 sq.m. but there are 460 human figures in it.

The village in the hug of three mountains

On the road to Gorno Draglishte. The village is located at the foot of Rila mountain, close to the small town of Razlog. Three mountains surround the place – Rila mountain, Pirin mountain and Rhodopi mountain. There is a small guest house there which has the ‘Green House’ certificate. That certificate is a brand for quality and hospitality; for authentic welcoming and care for the nature while hosts cater for their guests.

The house and its hosts offer various interesting traditional for the region activities. These are cooking local foods together with the attractive hostess, loom weaving. Also, using a distaff and a spindle, dancing traditional Bulgarian folklore dances…

Bansko, Nikopolis Ad Nestum, Leshten, Kovachevitsa, Delchevo – tours Bulgaria

We say goodbye to the attractive hosts and on the road to one of Bulgaria’s best ski resorts, Bansko. Bansko is a charming historic town with a stunning alpine background. Being part of the National Park Pirin, Bansko offers a great location for both summer vacations and ski holidays. There are multiple museums and landmarks in the town. 130 architectural and historical monuments of culture, seven of which are of national significance. Of the main sightseeings of the town of Bansko are the “St.Trinity” Church, the “Neofit Rilski” Museum Complex, the Museum House of Nikola Vaptsarov and the intellectual and historical centre “St. Paisiy Hilendarski”. In the Historical-Ethnographic Complex “Radonova House”, a rich ethnographic exposition presents in a unique way, the nature and the special features of the local material culture.

Nikopolis Ad Nestum. This is one of the three cities that the Roman Emperor Trajan built in year 106. He built it to celebrate the victory over the province of Dacia. It is in a very good condition. There is a wall around the huge city and inside you can see religious buildings, residential areas. And of course a huge Roman bath, with the area for the hot and cold water. Also the channels for the water and others.

Ah, that Rhodopi mountain

Tours Bulgaria continue with the villages of Leshten and Kovachevitsa. They are two colourful villages located in the Rhodopi mountain. Leshten attracts tourists with its authentic look and the old houses, preserved since the Bulgarian Revival (18th – 19th century). The church “”St Paraskeva”” is from the year 1837. Now it is an Architectural and Cultural Monument of local importance.
Kovachevitsa was established after 1656 and it was an educational centre. Because of its typical architecture, in 1977 the village became a historical and architectural reservation. Interesting to see is the church “St. Nikolas”, which was built in 1847.

Dolno Dryanovo, Kribul, Dospat, Trigrad

Rhodopi mountain is a magic place. There is special energy in this place. Warm, friendly people… Whichever place one visits there on tours Bulgaria, they will remember their experience. The following places are in the region of the mountain.

The villages of Dolno Dryanovo and Kribul and the town of Dospat. In Dolno Dryanovo the Stone heads sanctuary is of great interest. It is a prehistoric sanctuary together with a Thracian sanctuary. There are several stone figurines, for which people thought were a natural phenomenon. However, it appeared that they are human-made.

Follows the village of Kribul. It is famous, in tours Bulgaria, for the Skribina sanctuary. It’s a very interesting place. Lots of people visit the place to get healed. That much I will tell you and will let your imagination play with the information. Let us take you there to find out what Skribina is.

Dospat is not a very big town. Near it there is a beautiful dam. A stop there to relax, to enjoy the view and take some great photos.

For more information please visit www.enmarbg.com.

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Tour Packages Bulgaria

You are ready to explore your dreams and travel. Then, it’s time to plan your Bulgaria holiday and benefit from our tour packages Bulgaria.

We are here to take you around a small country with rich history, inspiring nature, mouth-watering cuisine and friendly people. Bulgaria and our private Bulgaria tours are a promise for unique experiences and memories.

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When we took the tourism path, we knew our love to Bulgaria only. It turned out to be enough to make our private tours in Bulgaria for you. We like to make you feel the spirit of times passed. Times which left their monuments, their stories, their secrets… You can join our Ancient Bulgaria tour and visit places that let your imagination take you back to the times when the mystic Thracians inhabited these lands. Places like Perperikon.
The medieval archaeological complex is one of the most ancient monumental megalithic structures, entirely carved into the rocks. People there worshipped the rocks as long ago as the Neolithic period.

This tour (like all our tour packages Bulgaria) starts in Sofia (Sofia city tour). From the capital of Bulgaria the journey through time takes you to places symbolic to the country. On this tour you will get to know the village of Tatul where a Thracian megalithic monument is awaiting you.

Ancient Neolithic and Thracian sites

Starosel is rich in ancient Neolithic and Thracian sites. Among them are the underground temple – it is the largest of its kind on the Balkans, and a mausoleum. Another important site, the Horizont tumulus, contains the only known Thracian temple to feature a colonnade.

The Valley of the Thracian Kings. There are dozens of Thracian burial mounds in the region around Kazanlak. The Big Kosmatka (Golyamata Kosmatka) tomb is one of the most impressive tombs, not only because of its size but because of the fact that nobody looted it.

Early Byzantine town of Nikopolis ad Istrum, another site which is part of our tour packages Bulgaria.

For more details, please visit www.enmarbg.com.

24/02/2019     0 Comments  

Tour Packages Balkan

Bulgaria is part of the Balkan Peninsula and is also marked with its difficult destiny. For that we made tour packages Balkan in different variations. Our wish is to make you breathe the air and feel the atmosphere of this interesting place, the Balkans.

American captain Fox talks about the ‘complicated Balkans’. We can only blame the position of the peninsula for the Balkan countries’ political destiny. Due to Balkans’ central location in Europe and the fact that they served as a bridge towards Asia; Balkans suffer the strong after-effect of every whim that Europe and the world had. Balkans were doomed to stand in the path of the greatest racial movements. The Balkans are full of surprises. They never fail to bring interesting stories.

Balkans are the cradle of ancient civilizations like the Hellenic and the Thracian ones. They are a mixture of races and beliefs, qualified by many as ‘explosive’.

Open the tour packages Balkan and enjoy their gifts

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For we are a Bulgarian company located in the very centre of the country, Kazanlak (the Valley of the Roses and the Thracian Kings), we like to introduce Bulgaria to you. Bulgaria with its unique nature, atmosphere and cultural heritage. We also like to reveal the different ‘similarities’ among the other countries, part of the jigsaw puzzle called the Balkans.

So, all you need to do is decide that it’s time for you to travel Bulgaria and have your Balkan holiday (tour packages Balkan). We believe that private Balkan tours are a good possibility to sink into the history of the region. It is a general belief that the Balkan Peninsula produces more history than it is capable of consuming.

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Treasures of Varna

Hunting the treasures of Varna in Bulgaria tours

Bulgaria Tours Day 1

Bulgaria Tours – a day spent in the city of Varna – the sea capital of Bulgaria, like people know Varna. Varna is the third biggest city in Bulgaria and one of the oldest settlements on these lands. Varna is the place where the oldest gold treasure in the world was found. The treasure dates back
from 4,600 BC to 4,200 BC. This same Varna becomes the home of the biggest and only one of the kind in the world cultural historical; and entertaining and educational museum. The museum opens in the spring of 2019. It is going to be like a time machine. People will be able ‘to travel back’ in time in the different eras; in the development of the human civilisation on the Bulgarian lands.

Varna as one of Bulgaria destinations that tourists like

People know Varna as an important cultural centre. It is packed with history and yet it’s very modern. A lively place that offers unforgettable moments. A good place for Bulgaria tours.

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A city tour around Varna will introduce you to the development of Varna during its different stages. The Archaeological Museum – people can follow the history and culture of Varna from its early centuries to the Second Bulgarian Kingdom.

Then, ‘Park-Museum of the Combat Friendship’. It is a pleasant place for relaxation both for families with children and individual tourists. It’s among the good tourist attractions in Bulgaria. It offers history monuments as well as nature beauties.

One of the symbols of the sea capital is the Cathedral of the Assumption of the Virgin, a temple for the ones praying and an attraction for the tourists. This holy place will take us in the world of spirituality. This is just the beginning of the tour around Varna and one of many
private tours Bulgaria.

Overnight in a hotel in Varna.

Bulgaria Tours Day 2

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After a nice start of the day with good breakfast, Bulgaria tours continues. We leave for a palace. A real one – Euxinograd Palace. It is a former late XIX-century royal palace and a park on the Bulgarian coast. Nowadays, the government representatives use Euxinograd for meeting other officials. Like every other place, the palace has its interesting stories. Once upon a time the place where it is now, used to be unfriendly and stony. It soon (nearly half a century) became the prince’s favourite place for rest…

For more details, please visit www.enmarbg.com.

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Grand Balkan Tour

You might not have already decided on your next holiday so here we are to help and offer you visit Bulgaria, plan your private tours Balkan and
contact us. The itinerary you will see below is the Balkan tour we made in 2015 for a lovely Malaysian group. We travelled 5000 km and visited 11 countries (Turkey, Bulgaria, Macedonia, Serbia, Kosovo, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Albania and Greece).

Great Private Tours Balkan

17 Aug 2015 Istanbul – Edirne – Haskovo (Turkey – Bulgaria)

Balkan Tour Edirne Bazaar

We met at the airport in Istanbul, Turkey and left for Haskovo in Bulgaria. As soon as we left the group started to sleep. After the long flight from Malaysia, they were right to go to sleep. We had a break in Edirne to explore the nice city. We saw Selimiye Mosque and its Bazaar. For lunch we tried the so famous liver in Edirne as well.

For the border of Bulgaria it was so difficult to make the custom officer put the names of the group in the system. Our Bulgaria travel started and we were ready to start our short Bulgaria holiday. It was really a short tour around Bulgaria. We couldn’t enjoy private Sofia tour. And Bulgaria has many things to offer. Jeep safari Bulgaria, for example, has adventurous spirit; offers great views and traditional food.

This article is copied from www.enmarbg.com. For more information, you can click on private tours Balkan.

23/02/2019     0 Comments  

Travel Bulgaria

A temptation to travel Bulgaria to see the Monastery and its unique architecture

Travel Bulgaria – The Rila Monastery – unity of spirituality, culture and nature…

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The Monastery has a unique architecture and takes about 8800 sq.m. When one looks from outside, it resembles a fortress. Due to its 24-metre stone walls, the Monastery has the shape of an irregular pentagon. Once the visitor travel Bulgaria is in, though, they are impressed by its architecture. Impressive arches and colonnades, covered wooden stairs and carved verandas…

St. Ivan of Rila

The hermit St. Ivan of Rila founded the monastery during the rule of Tsar Peter I. It is normal that the monastery bears the hermit’s name. Actually the hermit lived in a cave without any material possessions not far from the monastery’s location.

The long history of the buildings in the Rila Monastery goes back to late 10th century. Then the monastic community that the Rila hermit had founded, put up the first buildings. They were not far from the cave which he occupied. Normal as it is, St. Ivan Rilski’s death was the beginning of his legendary fame. The fame of a protector of the Bulgarian people.

Monastic Community

Eventually, in the XIV century, after changing its settlement several times, the monastic community settled in the fortress of Hrelyo. He was a feudal lord under Serbian suzerainty. The oldest building in the complex, the Tower of Hrelyo, date from this period, 1334–1335. It was the monastery’s fortress. Also the place where monks lived in times of trouble. There was a small church built next to Hrelyo’s Tower as well. Gradually, the influence of the Monastery grows bigger (travellers to Bulgaria can still feel it). Due to that, its fame spreaded far away from the borders of Bulgaria. People built new buildings to meet the needs of the already big enough monastic community.

However, the arrival of the Ottomans in the end of the 14th century was followed by numerous raids. As a result of that, a destruction of the monastery in the middle of the 15th century followed as well. Thanks to donations, the Rila Monastery was rebuilt in the end of the 15th century by three brothers.

The article above has been taken from www.enmarbg.com. To learn extra, please click on the next hyperlink travel Bulgaria.

15/02/2019     0 Comments  

Visit Bulgaria Middle Ages History

A Taste of Medieval Bulgaria

Visit Bulgaria Day 1

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Visit Bulgaria starts – Sofia – Vidin

Firstly, we welcome you for your visit Bulgaria holiday in the city of Sofia. After that we leave for the town of Vidin, where we will have lunch. In Vidin we will see Baba Vida Fortress – the only fully preserved medieval fortress in Bulgaria that lies on the very bank of the Danube River in the northern end of the beautiful town of Vidin.

Next, for the nature-lovers we can offer a visit to the famous Belogradchik Rocks and Magura Cave. They are both located no more than an hour away from the town.

Overnight in a hotel in Vidin.

Visit Bulgaria Day 2

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Vidin – Ruse (360 km, approximately 4 hour 50 min)

Our holiday Bulgaria continues. After breakfast we leave for the city of Ruse – Port of the Sixty Boats or later Ruschuk, the number one city in many terms in the past. Interestingly, the first railway station was constructed there. A contemporary publishing house was established as well. Also, they issued a newspaper there The city was the Headquarter of multiple consulates.

There will be a delicious lunch in Ruse.

Our impulse to get to know the history of the place will take us to the Regional Historical Museum where more than 130 000 monuments of culture are stored in. The only National Museum of Transport in Bulgaria is situated in Ruse, which is housed in the building of the first railway station in Bulgaria. Really interesting exponents can be found there like the coaches of the tsars Ferdinand and Boris III. Check in a hotel in Ruse and stay overnight.

The article above has been taken from www.enmarbg.com. To learn extra, please click on the next hyperlink visit Bulgaria.

10/02/2019     0 Comments